WEAR RED TOMORROW! Awareness days don’t prevent chronic disease, but they are a fun way to bring people together!

As we continue to honor healthy heart month, movement is strongly encouraged as it’s one of the best ways to help your heart stay strong! This is a sample of one way to move to increase your heart rate. This YouTube video from Well + Good is only 10 minutes, most of us have an extra 10 minutes in our day, the harder part is finding the motivation. Remember we can do this together, and it gets easier after the first few days of consistent movement.

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2018 state that adults should engage in 2.5 to 5.0 hours per week of moderate-intensity activity or 1.25 to 2.5 hours per week of vigorous activity in order to avoid preventable chronic diseases.

When to check with your doctor

Although moderate physical activity such as brisk walking is safe for most people, health experts suggest that you talk to your doctor before you start an exercise program if any of the following apply:

  • You have heart disease.
  • You have type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
  • You have kidney disease.
  • You have arthritis.
  • You’re being treated for cancer, or you’ve recently completed cancer treatment.
  • You have high blood pressure.

If you haven’t exercised regularly in a while, you may generally start exercising at a light to moderate level without seeing your doctor and gradually increase your activity.

You may also check with your doctor if you have symptoms that may be related to heart, lung or other serious disease such as:

  • Pain or discomfort in your chest, neck, jaw or arms at rest or during physical activity
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting with exercise or exertion
  • Shortness of breath with mild exertion, at rest, or when lying down or going to bed
  • Ankle swelling, especially at night
  • A rapid or pronounced heartbeat
  • A heart murmur that your doctor has previously diagnosed
  • Lower leg pain when you walk, which goes away with rest

Finally, the American College of Sports Medicine recommends that you see your doctor before engaging in moderate or vigorous exercise if:

  • You have heart disease, kidney disease, or type 1 or 2 diabetes, but no symptoms, and you don’t normally exercise
  • You have any symptoms of heart disease, kidney disease, or type 1 or 2 diabetes

When in doubt, check it out

If you’re unsure of your health status, have multiple health problems or are pregnant, speak with your doctor before starting a new exercise program. Working with your doctor ahead of time can help you plan the exercise program that’s right for you. And that’s a good first step on your path to physical fitness.

Sources: Exercise: When to check with your doctor first – Mayo Clinic

Engaging in Recommended Amounts of Exercise Lowers the Risk of Seven Types of Cancer (curetoday.com)

Join the discussion! Do you have favorite workouts on YouTube? If you have fitness videos you really like, share the link in the comments below! Or tell us about your local gym or fitness routine.

We’ve had tremendous outpouring of community support, feedback, and great tips. We’d love to hear from you in the comments below (and you’ll even earn 5 bonus points each day, if you are logged into your Go! account and share).

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