People need to make a living wage and be paid fairly. Strides are being made, but The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported in 2020, women still earn 82 cents for every dollar a man earns. The University of Pennslyvania’s Wharton School of business conducted a study in 2021 that suggests raises in income do correlate with greater experienced well-being. As we continue to celebrate amazing accomplishments during National Women’s History Month, let’s use today as a call to action. Income inequality is nothing new, but valuing people and the skills they bring to the table now that’s trend-worthy! Acknowledging the issue by talking about it is a great start. Here are additional things we can do and keep talking about to take action to end the wage gap where we work.

  1. Be Open About Salary – One of the greatest ways to encourage an equitable and well balanced workplace it to openly discuss salaries.
  2. Pay Attention and Ask Questions Regarding Discriminatory Hiring and Pay Practices – Employers who base pay on salary history perpetuate implicit bias, since basing pay on past earnings makes it even more difficult for women to increase their income when moving between different positions and companies. This also occurs when employers routinely choose men over women for higher-paying managerial positions.
  3. Implement Fair Scheduling Practices. Several states have implemented “fair workweek” laws designed to increase flexiblity when it comes to employee work schedules. These policies help make workplaces more family-friendly for working parents and mothers.
  4. Request A Pay Audit- Companies can conduct pay eqity audits to ensure that all employees of equal experience and in similar roles are paid the same – no matter thier gender or race. Look around and ask who is doing equalivant work and are they being paid equally.

Click here for more information: https://blog.dol.gov/2021/03/19/5-facts-about-the-state-of-the-gender-pay-gap#:~:text=Women%20earn%2082%20cents%20for,for%20many%20women%20of%20color.

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